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Dinosaur National Monument

Dinosaur National Monument

The border of Utah and Colorado is the location of the Dinosaur National Monument.  The Quarry Area is the main focus point and has about 1,600 exposed bones of eleven different species of dinosaurs.  The Quarry Area, also known as the Douglass Quarry, was named after Earl Douglass, a paleontologist who worked for the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.

The big discovery occurred on August 17, 1909 as Earl Douglass was walking in small drainages which were found in the Morrison Formation.  Other skeletal remains of dinosaurs have also been found in the Morrison Formation in Colorado.  He found eight tail vertebrae of an Apatosaurus still connected.  The excavation of these tail vertebrae resulted in "one of the best and most complete skeletons" of a dinosaur.

The excavation work took fifteen years to complete.  About 350 tons of rock and fossils were removed from the quarry area.  Many of Douglass' techniques are still used by paleontologists.  After the bones were excavated, they were covered with paper first and secondly with plaster-soaked burlap strips.  Each burlap jacket was labeled with its contents and then placed into a wooden crate for the journey to Carnegie Museum.

 Bones Bones Dinosaur Head

 Photos of Douglass Quarry

 

Tools Used by Paleontologists
Tools Used by Paleontologists

Work Area of Douglass Quarry
Work Area of Douglass Quarry

References
http://www.go-utah.com/dinosaur_national_monument
http://www.nps.gov/dino/dougg.htm

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